Mathematics

2020 PIMS-UBC Math Job Forum for Postdoctoral Fellows and Graduate Students

Speaker: 
Andrew Brown
Eugene Li
Kathryn Nyman
Brian Wetton
Date: 
Mon, Oct 26, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Abstract: 

The PIMS-UBC Math Job Forum is an annual Forum to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in Mathematics and related areas with their job searches. The session is divided in two parts: short presentations from our panel followed by a discussion.

Learn the secrets of writing an effective research statement, developing an outstanding CV, and giving a winning job talk. We will address questions like: Who do I ask for recommendation letters? What kind of jobs should I apply to? What can I do to maximize my chances of success?

Class: 
Subject: 

Measure rigidity of Cartan actions

Speaker: 
Kurt Vinhage
Date: 
Mon, Oct 19, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
University of Utah
CRG: 
Abstract: 

We'll take an introductory peek into the measure rigidity program for higher-rank abelian actions by looking at the simplest case, Anosov Z^k actions on (k+1)-dimensional tori. The main structures and ideas appearing in the theory will be explained, as well as how the situation becomes more complicated under fewer assumptions.

Class: 
Subject: 

Packings of Partial Difference Sets

Speaker: 
Shuxing Li
Date: 
Wed, Oct 14, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, Simon Fraser University
Conference: 
Emergent Research: The PIMS Postdoctoral Fellow Seminar
Abstract: 

As the underlying configuration behind many elegant finite structures, partial difference sets have been intensively studied in design theory, finite geometry, coding theory, and graph theory. Over the past three decades, there have been numerous constructions of partial difference sets in abelian groups with high exponent, accompanied by numerous very different and delicate techniques. Surprisingly, we manage to unify and extend a great many previous constructions in a common framework, using only elementary methods. The key insight is that, instead of focusing on one single partial difference set, we consider a packing of partial difference sets, namely, a collection of disjoint partial difference sets in a finite abelian group. Although the packing of partial difference sets has been implicitly studied in various contexts, we recognize that a particular subgroup reveals crucial structural information about the packing. Identifying this subgroup allows us to formulate a recursive lifting construction of packings in abelian groups of increasing exponent.

This is joint work with Jonathan Jedwab.

Speaker Bio

Shuxing Li received his Ph. D. degree in Mathematics from Zhejiang University, China, in 2016. From September 2016 to September 2017, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Department of Mathematics, Simon Fraser University. He was an Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow from October 2017 to September 2019, at Faculty of Mathematics, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany. Since November 2019, he is a PIMS Postdoctoral Fellow at Department of Mathematics, Simon Fraser University. His research focuses on finite configurations with strong symmetry, which involves algebraic and combinatorial design theory, algebraic coding theory, and finite geometry. In 2018, he received the Kirkman Medal from the Institute of Combinatorics and its Applications in recognition of the excellence of his research.

Class: 
Subject: 

The Life and Numbers of Richard Guy (1916 – 2020)

Speaker: 
Hugh Williams
Date: 
Fri, Oct 2, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, University of Calgary
Conference: 
Celebrating the Life of Dr. Richard Guy
CRG: 
Abstract: 

Over fifty years ago Richard Kenneth Guy joined the then Department of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science at the nascent University of Calgary. Although he retired from the University in 1982, he continued, even in his last year, to come in to the University every day and work on the mathematics that he loved. In this talk I will provide a glimpse into the life and research of this most remarkable man. In doing this, I will recount several of the important events of Richard’s life and briefly discuss some of his mathematical contributions.

About Dr. Williams

: Dr. Hugh Williams is internationally recognized as an expert in computational number theory and its applications to cryptography. Shortly after obtaining his Ph.D. in 1969 from the Department of Applied Analysis and Computer Science at the University of Waterloo, he joined the newly established Department of Computer Science at the University of Manitoba, where he was promoted to the rank of Full Professor in 1979. He also served there as Associate Dean of Science for Research Development for seven years (1994-2001). He moved to the University of Calgary in 2001 to take up the iCORE Chair for Algorithmic Number Theory and Cryptography (2001-2013) and retired as Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and Statistics in 2016. Dr. Williams has authored over 150 refereed journal papers, 30 refereed conference papers and 20 books or book chapters, and from 1983-85 held a national Killam Research Fellowship. In February 2009, Dr, Williams was selected for a six year term as the inaugural Director of the Tutte Institute for Mathematics and Computing (TIMC), a highly classified research facility established by the federal government. In 2016, he was appointed Professor Emeritus in Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Calgary.

Class: 

The Notorious Collatz conjecture

Speaker: 
Terence Tao
Date: 
Thu, Oct 1, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, University of Calgary
Conference: 
Louise and Richard K. Guy Lecture Series
Abstract: 

Start with any natural number. If it is even, divide it by two. If instead it is odd, multiply it by three and add one. Now repeat this process indefinitely. The Collatz conjecture asserts that no matter how large an initial number one starts with, this process eventually reaches the number one (and then loops back to one indefinitely after that). This conjecture has been tested for quintillions of initial numbers, but remains unsolved in general; it is perhaps one of the simplest to state problems in all of mathematics that remains open; it is also one of the most notorious "mathematical diseases" that can lure professional and amateur mathematicians alike into devoting hours of futile effort into trying to solve the problem. While it is itself mostly a curiosity, and the full resolution still remains well out of reach of current technology, the Collatz problem is a model example of the more general concept of a dynamical system, which occurs throughout mathematics and science; and so progress on the Collatz conjecture can shed some light on the more general problem of understanding dynamical systems. In this lecture we give some of the history of the Collatz conjecture and some of its variants, and also describe some recent partial results on the problem.

About Dr. Tao:

Terence Tao was born in Adelaide, Australia in 1975. He has been a professor of mathematics at UCLA since 1999. Tao's areas of research include harmonic analysis, PDE, combinatorics, and number theory. He has received a number of awards, including the Fields Medal in 2006, the MacArthur Fellowship in 2007, the Waterman Award in 2008, and the Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics in 2015. Terence Tao also currently holds the James and Carol Collins chair in mathematics at UCLA, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the National Academy of Sciences.

Class: 

Crossing Numbers of Large Complete Graphs

Speaker: 
Noam Elkies
Date: 
Fri, Oct 2, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, University of Calgary
Conference: 
The Unsolved Problems Conference: Celebrating the living legacy of the mathematics of Richard Guy
CRG: 
Abstract: 

TBA

Class: 

Aliquot sequences

Speaker: 
Carl Pomerance
Date: 
Fri, Oct 2, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, University of Calgary
Conference: 
The Unsolved Problems Conference: Celebrating the living legacy of the mathematics of Richard Guy
Abstract: 

These are sequences formed by iterating the sum-of-proper-divisors function. For example: 12, 16, 15, 9, 4, 3, 1, 0. Of interest since Pythagoras, who remarked on the fixed point 6 (a perfect number) and the 2-cycle 220, 284 (an amicable pair), aliquot sequences were also one of Richard Guy's favorite subjects. The Catalan--Dickson conjecture asserts that every aliquot sequence is bounded (either terminates at zero or becomes periodic), while the Guy--Selfridge counter-conjecture asserts that many aliquot sequences diverge to infinity. It is interesting that Guy and Selfridge would make such a claim since no aliquot sequence is known to diverge, though the numerical evidence is certainly suggestive. The first case in doubt is the sequence beginning with 276. This talk will survey what's known about the problem and give evidence for and against the two countervailing views.

Class: 

The favorite elliptic curve of Richard

Speaker: 
Jaap Top
Date: 
Fri, Oct 2, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, University of Calgary
Conference: 
The Unsolved Problems Conference: Celebrating the living legacy of the mathematics of Richard Guy
CRG: 
Abstract: 

Even in the title of one of his papers, Richard Guy called the elliptic curve with equation $y^2 = x^3 - 4x + 4$ his favorite. During the CNTA-XIV meeting in Calgary in 2016, I recalled some of his reasons for this (with Richard listening from the front row). The story as well as a few additional developments will also be the topic of the present lecture.

Class: 

Richard Guy and the Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences: A Fifty-Year Friendship

Speaker: 
Neil J. Sloane
Date: 
Fri, Oct 2, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, University of Calgary
Conference: 
The Unsolved Problems Conference: Celebrating the living legacy of the mathematics of Richard Guy
Abstract: 

Richard Guy was a supporter of the database of integer sequences right from its beginning in the 1960s. This talk will be illustrated by sequences that he contributed, sequences he wrote about, and especially sequences with open problems that he would have liked but that I never got to tell him about.

Class: 

The Unity of Combinatorics: Connections and Wonders

Speaker: 
Bud Brown
Date: 
Fri, Oct 2, 2020
Location: 
Zoom
PIMS, University of Calgary
Conference: 
The Unsolved Problems Conference: Celebrating the living legacy of the mathematics of Richard Guy
CRG: 
Abstract: 

An account of how a great Guy and his Brown coauthor created a 300-page book entitled "The Unity of Combinatorics" out of a 30-page paper from 1995 of the same name. The latter was an outline of a proposed lecture series, whose purpose was to feature the many connections within the vast area of combinatorics, thereby dispelling the then prevalent notion that combinatorics is just a bag of tricks. In writing the book, we took this notion and ran with it --- and how!

I'll talk about a number of these connections and some topics that seem almost magical, including Beatty sequences, Conway worms, games played with turtles instead of coins, and a way of viewing the non-negative integers as a field. The book begins with a child playing with colored blocks on his living-room rug and ends with a description of the Miracle Octad Generator. Finally, I'll talk about working with this gentlemanly giant of the world of numbers and sequences and patterns and games.

Class: 

Pages