Mathematical Biology

Environmental Escape from the Prisoner's Dilemma

Speaker: 
Jaye Sudweeks
Date: 
Wed, Jul 28, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

During reproduction, viruses manufacture products that diffuse within the host cell. Because a virus does not have exclusive access to its own gene products, coinfection of multiple viruses allows for strategies of cooperation and defection— cooperators produce large amounts of gene product while defectors produce less product but specialize in appropriating a larger share of the common pool. Experimental data shows that, under conditions where coinfection is common, bacteriophage $\Phi$6 becomes trapped in a Prisoner’s dilemma, with defectors spreading to fixation, causing lowered population fitness. However, these experiments did not allow for fluctuation in the density of the external viral population. Here, I’ll discuss a model formulated to see if environmental feedback can free $\Phi$6 from the Prisoner’s dilemma. I’ll also discuss the concept of the Effective Game, which incorporates the frequency and density of different viral types in the environment.

Class: 

Dynamic Self Organization and Microscale Fluid Properties of Nucleoplasm

Speaker: 
Jay Newby
Date: 
Wed, Jul 21, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

The principal function of the nucleus is to facilitate storage, retrieval, and maintenance of the genetic information encoded into DNA and RNA sequences. A unique feature of nucleoplasm—the fluid of the nucleus—is that it contains chromatin (DNA) and RNA.

In contrast to other important biological polymer hydrogels, such as mucus and extracellular matrix, the nucleic acid polymers have a sequence. Recent experiments have shown that during the growth phase of the cell cycle, chromatin condenses in a sequence specific manner into regions within the nucleoplasm, possibly so that functionally related genes are grouped together spatially even though they might be far apart in terms of sequence distance.

At the same time, we are becoming increasingly aware of the role of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in cellular processes in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Complex molecular interactions over a wide range of timescales can cause large biopolymers (RNA, protein, etc) to phase separate from the surrounding nucleoplasm into distinct biocondensates (spherical droplets in the simplest cases).

I will discuss recent work modelling the role of nuclear biocondensates in neurodegenerative disease and several ongoing projects related to
modelling and microscopy image analysis.

Class: 

Epidemic arrivals and Antibiotic Calenders

Speaker: 
Alastair Jamieson-Lane
Date: 
Wed, Jul 7, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

Here I give two tiny talks on some of my research from the past couple years. In the first half of the talk I re-examine some popular heuristics for epidemic "time of spread" through the world airline network, and use hitting times and branching processes to explore the mathematical underpinnings of these observations. In the second half of the talk, we zoom in to exploring how antibiotics spreads through a single hospital, the various models and their conflicting recommendations. Mostly just some straightforward dynamical systems, with the opportunity for some cute asymptotic arguments on the side.

Class: 

Dynamical inference for biological processes through the lens of optimal transport

Speaker: 
Stephen Zhang
Date: 
Wed, Jun 30, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

Understanding how cells change their identity and behaviour over time in living systems is a key question in many fields of biology. Measurement of cell states is inherently destructive, and so the relationship of the current state of a cell to some future state, or ‘fate’, cannot be observed experimentally. Trajectory inference refers to the general problem of trying to estimate various aspects of the state-fate relationship. We discuss optimal transport as a useful analytical tool for trajectory inference, and we develop a mathematical framework for recovering trajectories in both non-equilibrium as well as equilibrium systems.

Class: 

The impact of social, economic, environmental factors and public health measures on the dynamics of COVID-19

Speaker: 
Jude Kong
Date: 
Wed, Jun 2, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

The COVID-19 pandemic has passed its initial peak in most countries in the world, making it ripe to assess whether the basic reproduction number (R0) is different across countries and what demographic, social, and environmental factors other than interventions characterize vulnerability to the virus. In this talk, I will show the association (linear and non-linear) between COVID-19 R0 across countries and 17 demographic, social and environmental variables obtained using a generalized additive model. Moreover, I will present a mathematical model of COVID-19 that we designed and used to explore the effects of adopting various vaccination and relaxation strategies on the COVID-19 epidemiological long-term projections in Ontario. Our findings are able to provide public health bodies with important insights on the effect of adopting various mitigation strategies, thereby guiding them in the decision-making process.

Class: 

Stochastic Organization in the Mitotic Spindle

Speaker: 
Christopher Miles
Date: 
Wed, May 19, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

For cells to divide, they must undergo mitosis: the process of spatially organizing their copied DNA (chromosomes) to precise locations in the cell. This procedure is carried out by stochastic components that manage to accomplish the task with astonishing speed and accuracy. New advances from our collaborators in the New York Dept of Health provide 3D spatial trajectories of every chromosome in a cell during mitosis. Can these trajectories tell us anything about the mechanisms driving them? The structure and context of this cutting-edge data makes utilizing classical tools from data science or particle tracking challenging. I will discuss my progress with Alex Mogilner on developing analysis for this data and mathematical modeling of emergent phenomena.

Class: 

Optimal curvature in long-range cell-cell communication

Speaker: 
Jun Allard
Date: 
Wed, May 5, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

Cells in tissue can communicate short-range via direct contact, and long-range via diffusive signals. In addition, another class of cell-cell communication is by long, thin cellular protrusions that are ~100 microns in length and ~100 nanometers in width. These so-called non-canonical protrusions include cytonemes, nanotubes, and airinemes. But, before establishing communication, they must find their target cell. Here we demonstrate airinemes in zebrafish are consistent with a finite persistent random walk model. We study this model by stochastic simulation, and by numerically solving the survival probability equation using Strang splitting. The probability of contacting the target cell is maximized for a balance between ballistic search (straight) and diffusive (highly curved, random) search. We find that the curvature of airinemes in zebrafish, extracted from live cell microscopy, is approximately the same value as the optimum in the simple persistent random walk model. We also explore the ability of the target cell to infer direction of the airineme’s source, finding the experimentally observed parameters to be at a Pareto optimum balancing directional sensing with contact initiation.

Class: 

Cell symmetry breaking for movement through a mechanochemical mechanism

Speaker: 
Calina Copos
Date: 
Wed, Apr 28, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

To initiate movement, cells need to form a well-defined "front" and "rear" through the process of cellular polarization. Polarization is a crucial process involved in embryonic development and cell motility and it is not yet well understood. Mathematical models that have been developed to study the onset of polarization have explored either biochemical or mechanical pathways, yet few have proposed a combined mechano-chemical mechanism. However, experimental evidence suggests that most motile cells rely on both biochemical and mechanical components to break symmetry. I will describe a mechano-chemical mathematical model for emergent organization driven by both cytoskeletal dynamics and biochemical reactions. We have identified one of the simplest quantitative frameworks for a possible mechanism for spontaneous symmetry breaking for initiation of cell movement. The framework relies on local, linear coupling between minimal biochemical stochastic and mechanical deterministic systems; this coupling between mechanics and biochemistry has been speculated biologically, yet through our model, we demonstrate it is a necessary and sufficient condition for a cell to achieve a polarized state.

Class: 

Stochasticity in an ecological model of the microbiome influences the efficacy of simulated bacteriotherapies

Speaker: 
Eric Jones
Date: 
Wed, Apr 28, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
PIMS, Simon Fraser University
Conference: 
Emergent Research: The PIMS Postdoctoral Fellow Seminar
Abstract: 

We consider a stochastic bistable two-species generalized Lotka-Volterra model of the microbiome and use it as a testbed to analytically and numerically explore the role of direct (e.g., fecal microbiota transplantation) and indirect (e.g., changes in diet) bacteriotherapies. Two types of noise are included in this model, representing the immigration of bacteria into and within the gut (additive noise) and variations in growth rate associated with the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of resources (multiplicative noise). The efficacy of a bacteriotherapy is determined by comparing the mean first-passage times (the average time required for the system to transition from one basin of attraction to the other) with and without the intervention. Concepts from transition path theory are used to investigate how the role of noise affects these bacteriotherapies.

Class: 

Feedback onto cellular polarization from paxillin, implications for migrating cells

Speaker: 
Laurent MacKay
Date: 
Wed, Apr 14, 2021
Location: 
Zoom
Online
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Abstract: 

Cellular polarization plays a critical during cellular differentiation, development, and cellular migration through the establishment of a long-lived cell-front and cell-rear. Although mechanisms of polarization vary across cells types, some common biochemical players have emerged, namely the RhoGTPases Rac and Rho. The low diffusion coefficient of the active form of these molecules combined with their mutual inhibitory interaction dynamics have led to a prototypical pattern-formation system that can polarizes cell through a non-Turing pattern formation mechanism termed wave-pinning. We investigate the effects of paxillin, a master regulator of adhesion dynamics, on the Rac-Rho system through a positive feedback loop that amplifies Rac activation. We find that paxillin feedback onto the Rac-Rho system produces cells that (i) self-polarize in the absence of any input signal (i.e., paxllin feedback causes a Turing instability) and (ii) become arrested due to the development of multiple protrusive regions. The former effect is a positive finding that can be related to certain cell-types, while the latter outcome is likely an artefact of the model. In order to minimize the effects of this artefact and produce cells that can both self-polarize as well as migrate for extended periods of time, we revisit some of model's parameter values and use lessons from previous models of polarization. This approach allows us to draw conclusions about the biophysical properties and spatiotemporal dynamics of molecular systems required for autonomous decision making during cellular migration.

Class: 

Pages