Mathematics

Memory Induced Animal Movement Patterns

Speaker: 
Ulrike Schlaegel
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

New geometric and functional analytic ideas arising from problems in symplectic geometry

Speaker: 
Helmut Hofer
Date: 
Mon, Oct 23, 2006
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
PIMS 10th Anniversary Lectures
Abstract: 
The study of moduli spaces of holomorphic curves in symplectic geometry is the key ingredient for the construction of symplectic invariants. These moduli spaces are suitable compactifications of solution spaces of a first order nonlinear Cauchy-Riemann type operator. The solution spaces are usually not compact due to bubbling-off phenomena and other analytical difficulties.

Perfect Crystals for Quantum Affine Algebras and Combinatorics of Young Walls

Speaker: 
Seok-Jin Kang
Date: 
Fri, Jul 10, 2009
Location: 
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Conference: 
1st PRIMA Congress
Abstract: 
In this talk, we will give a detailed exposition of theory of perfect crystals, which has brought us a lot of significant applications. On the other hand, we will also discuss the strong connection between the theory of perfect crystals and combinatorics of Young walls. We will be able to derive LLT algorithm of computing global bases using affine paths. The interesting problem is how to construct affine Hecke algebras out of affine paths.

Emerging Aboriginal Scholars Summer Camp

Speaker: 
Melania Alvarez
Date: 
Thu, Sep 29, 2011
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
Emerging Aboriginal Scholars
Abstract: 
From July 4 to August 5, 2011, the UBC First Nations House of Learning and PIMS ran a summer camp for grade 10 and 11 students with First Nations backgrounds. The camp combined academics and cultural components. In this video we meet some of the camp organizers and participants. Videography by Elle-Maija Tailfeathers.

Expanders, Group Theory, Arithmetic Geometry, Cryptography and Much More

Speaker: 
Eyal Goran
Date: 
Tue, Apr 6, 2010
Location: 
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
CRG: 
Number Theory (2010-2013)
Abstract: 
This is a lecture given on the occasion of the launch of the PIMS CRG in "L-functions and Number Theory". The theory of expander graphs is undergoing intensive development. It finds more and more applications to diverse areas of mathematics. In this talk, aimed at a general audience, I will introduce the concept of expander graphs and discuss some interesting connections to arithmetic geometry, group theory and cryptography, including some very recent breakthroughs.

Small Number Counts to 100

Speaker: 
Veselin Jungic
Speaker: 
Mark Maclean
Speaker: 
Rena Sinclair
Date: 
Sun, Nov 22, 2009
Location: 
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
BIRS First Nations Math Education Workshop
Abstract: 
This short animation movie is a math education resource based on Aboriginal culture. For more information, visit: http://www.math.sfu.ca/~vjungic/SmallNumber.html Special Thanks To: Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery Department of Mathematics, Simon Fraser University Pacific Institute For Mathematical Sciences Sean O'Reilly, Arcana Studios The IRMACS Centre, Simon Fraser University

Quantum Magic in Secret Communication

Speaker: 
Gilles Brassard
Date: 
Tue, Apr 6, 2010
Location: 
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
CRG: 
Mathematics of Quantum Information (2010-2013)
Abstract: 
In this talk, we shall tell the tale of the origin of Quantum Cryptography from the birth of the first idea by Wiesner in 1970 to the invention of Quantum Key Distribution in 1983, to the first prototypes and ensuing commercial ventures, to exciting prospects for the future. No prior knowledge in quantum mechanics or cryptography will be expected.

Small Number Counts to 100 (Blackfoot)

Speaker: 
Veselin Jungic
Speaker: 
Mark Maclean
Speaker: 
Rena Sinclair
Date: 
Sun, Nov 22, 2009
Location: 
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
BIRS First Nations Math Education Workshop
Abstract: 
This short animation movie is a math education resource based on Aboriginal culture. For more information, visit: http://www.math.sfu.ca/~vjungic/SmallNumber.html This version of the video was recorded by Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn of the Pikani First Nation in Blackfoot. Special Thanks To: Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery Department of Mathematics, Simon Fraser University Pacific Institute For Mathematical Sciences Sean O'Reilly, Arcana Studios The IRMACS Centre, Simon Fraser University

What I am Doing in Australia

Speaker: 
Jonathan Borwein
Date: 
Tue, May 17, 2011
Location: 
IRMACS Center, Simon Fraser University
Conference: 
JonFest 2011, Computation & Analytical Mathematics Conference
Abstract: 
Jonathan Borwein talks about his current research and the Priority Research Center for Computer Assisted Research Mathematics and its Applications (CARMA). Professor Borwein is both a Laureate Professor and the Director at CARMA which is located at the University of Newcastle in New South Wales, Australia.

Cloaking and Transformation Optics

Speaker: 
Gunther Uhlmann
Date: 
Mon, Jul 6, 2009
Location: 
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Conference: 
1st PRIMA Congress
Abstract: 
We describe recent theoretical and experimental progress on making objects invisible to detection by electromagnetic waves, acoustic waves and quantum waves. Maxwell's equations have transformation laws that allow for design of electromagnetic materials that steer light around a hidden region, returning it to its original path on the far side. Not only would observers be unaware of the contents of the hidden region, they would not even be aware that something was being hidden. The object, which would have no shadow, is said to be cloaked. We recount the recent history of the subject and discuss some of the mathematical and physical issues involved, especially the use of singular transformations.
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