warning: Creating default object from empty value in /www/www.mathtube.org/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Scientific

Life History Variations and the Dynamics of Structured Populations

Speaker: 
Romain Richard
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

Modeling Spotting in Wildland Fire

Speaker: 
Jonathan Martin
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

The Broughton Archipeligo Monitoring Program

Speaker: 
Stephanie Peacock
Date: 
Fri, Jul 15, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

Patterns of Social Foraging

Speaker: 
Leah Keshet
Date: 
Fri, Jul 15, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
I will present recent results from my group that pertain to spatio-temporal patterns formed by social foragers. Starting from work on chemotaxis by Lee A. Segel (who was my PhD thesis supervisor), I will discuss why simple taxis of foragers and randomly moving prey cannot lead to spontaneous emergence of patchiness. I will then show how a population of foragers with two types of behaviours can do so. I will discuss conditions under which one or another of these behaviours leads to a winning strategy in the sense of greatest food intake. This problem was motivated by social foraging in eiderducks overwintering in the Belcher Islands, studied by Joel Heath. The project is joint with post-doctoral fellows, Nessy Tania, Ben Vanderlei, and Joel Heath.

Brains and Frogs: Structured Population Models

Speaker: 
Kerry Landman
Date: 
Sat, Jul 16, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
In diverse contexts, populations of cells and animals disperse and invade a spatial region over time. Frequently, the individuals that make up the population undergo a transition from a motile to an immotile state. A steady-state spatial distribution evolves as all the individuals settle. Moreover, there may be multiple releases of motile subpopulation. If so, the interactions between motile and immotile subpopulations may affect the final spatial distribution of the various releases. The development of the brain cortex and the translocation of threatened Maud Island frog are two applications we have considered.

A New Approach to the Bar-Cobar Duality

Speaker: 
André Joyal
Date: 
Mon, Jul 18, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
Category Theory 2011
Abstract: 
The bar-cobar duality is playing a fundamental role in the Koszul duality for algebras and operads. We use Sweedler theory of measurings to reformulate and extend the duality. This is joint work with Matthieu Anel.

The Hypoelliptic Laplacian

Speaker: 
Jean-Michel Bismut
Date: 
Fri, Sep 23, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
PIMS/UBC Distinguished Colloquium Series
Abstract: 
If X is a Riemannian manifold, the Laplacian is a second order elliptic operator on X. The hypoelliptic Laplacian L_b is an operator acting on the total space of the tangent bundle of X, that is supposed to interpolate between the elliptic Laplacian (when b -> 0) and the geodesic flow (when b -> \infty). Up to lower order terms, L_b is a weighted sum of the harmonic oscillator along the fibre TX and of the generator of the geodesic flow. In the talk, we will explain the underlying algebraic, analytic and probabilistic aspects of its construction, and outline some of the applications obtained so far.

Approximating Functions in High Dimensions

Speaker: 
Albert Cohen
Date: 
Mon, Mar 14, 2011
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
IAM-PIMS-MITACS Distinguished Colloquium Series
Abstract: 
This talk will discuss mathematical problems which are challenged by the fact they involve functions of a very large number of variables. Such problems arise naturally in learning theory, partial differential equations or numerical models depending on parametric or stochastic variables. They typically result in numerical difficulties due to the so-called ''curse of dimensionality''. We shall explain how these difficulties may be handled in various contexts, based on two important concepts: (i) variable reduction and (ii) sparse approximation.

Virtual Lung Project at UNC: What's Math Got To Do With It?

Speaker: 
Gregory Forest
Date: 
Fri, Mar 18, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Abstract: 
A group of scientists at the University of North Carolina, from theorists to clinicians, have coalesced over the past decade on an effort called the Virtual Lung Project. There is a parallel VLP at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, focused on environmental health, but I will focus on our effort. We come from mathematics, chemistry, computer science, physics, lung biology, biophysics and medicine. The goal is to engineer lung health through combined experimental-theoretical-computational tools to measure, assess, and predict lung function and dysfunction. Now one might ask, with all due respect to Tina Turner: what's math got to do with it? My lecture is devoted to many responses, including some progress yet more open problems.

Frozen Boundaries and Log Fronts

Speaker: 
Andrei Okounkov
Date: 
Mon, Oct 16, 2006
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
PIMS 10th Anniversary Lectures
Abstract: 
In this talk, based on joint work with Richard Kenyon and Grisha Mikhalkin, Andrei Okounkov discusses a binary operation on plane curves which
  1. generalizes classical duality for plane curves and
  2. arises naturally in probabilistic context,
namely as a facet boundary in certain random surface models.
Syndicate content