warning: Creating default object from empty value in /www/www.mathtube.org/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 33.

Scientific

Sparse Optimization Algorithms and Applications

Speaker: 
Stephen Wright
Date: 
Mon, Apr 4, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
IAM-PIMS-MITACS Distinguished Colloquium Series
Abstract: 
In many applications of optimization, an exact solution is less useful than a simple, well structured approximate solution. An example is found in compressed sensing, where we prefer a sparse signal (e.g. containing few frequencies) that matches the observations well to a more complex signal that matches the observations even more closely. The need for simple, approximate solutions has a profound effect on the way that optimization problems are formulated and solved. Regularization terms can be introduced into the formulation to induce the desired structure, but such terms are often non-smooth and thus may complicate the algorithms. On the other hand, an algorithm that is too slow for finding exact solutions may become competitive and even superior when we need only an approximate solution. In this talk we outline the range of applications of sparse optimization, then sketch some techniques for formulating and solving such problems, with a particular focus on applications such as compressed sensing and data analysis.

Multi Variable Operator Theory with Relations

Speaker: 
Ken Davidson
Date: 
Tue, May 24, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
Canadian Operator Symposium 2011 (COSY)
Abstract: 
TBA

Min Protein Patter Formation

Speaker: 
William Carlquist
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

Memory Induced Animal Movement Patterns

Speaker: 
Ulrike Schlaegel
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

The Mathematics of Doodling

Speaker: 
Ravi Vakil
Date: 
Mon, May 30, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of British Columbia
Conference: 
2011 Niven Lecture
Abstract: 
Doodling has many mathematical aspects: patterns, shapes, numbers, and more. Not surprisingly, there is often some sophisticated and fun mathematics buried inside common doodles. I'll begin by doodling, and see where it takes us. It looks like play, but it reflects what mathematics is really about: finding patterns in nature, explaining them, and extending them. By the end, we'll have seen some important notions in geometry, topology, physics, and elsewhere; some fundamental ideas guiding the development of mathematics over the course of the last century; and ongoing work continuing today.

Life History Variations and the Dynamics of Structured Populations

Speaker: 
Romain Richard
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

Modeling Spotting in Wildland Fire

Speaker: 
Jonathan Martin
Date: 
Thu, Jul 14, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

The Broughton Archipeligo Monitoring Program

Speaker: 
Stephanie Peacock
Date: 
Fri, Jul 15, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
This talk was one of the IGTC Student Presentations.

Patterns of Social Foraging

Speaker: 
Leah Keshet
Date: 
Fri, Jul 15, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
I will present recent results from my group that pertain to spatio-temporal patterns formed by social foragers. Starting from work on chemotaxis by Lee A. Segel (who was my PhD thesis supervisor), I will discuss why simple taxis of foragers and randomly moving prey cannot lead to spontaneous emergence of patchiness. I will then show how a population of foragers with two types of behaviours can do so. I will discuss conditions under which one or another of these behaviours leads to a winning strategy in the sense of greatest food intake. This problem was motivated by social foraging in eiderducks overwintering in the Belcher Islands, studied by Joel Heath. The project is joint with post-doctoral fellows, Nessy Tania, Ben Vanderlei, and Joel Heath.

Brains and Frogs: Structured Population Models

Speaker: 
Kerry Landman
Date: 
Sat, Jul 16, 2011
Location: 
PIMS, University of Victoria
Conference: 
AMP Math Biology Workshop
Conference: 
2011 IGTC Summit
Abstract: 
In diverse contexts, populations of cells and animals disperse and invade a spatial region over time. Frequently, the individuals that make up the population undergo a transition from a motile to an immotile state. A steady-state spatial distribution evolves as all the individuals settle. Moreover, there may be multiple releases of motile subpopulation. If so, the interactions between motile and immotile subpopulations may affect the final spatial distribution of the various releases. The development of the brain cortex and the translocation of threatened Maud Island frog are two applications we have considered.
Syndicate content