Applied

Wave-equation Migration

Author: 
Robert J. Ferguson
Date: 
Tue, Aug 1, 2006
Location: 
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
Conference: 
Seismic Imaging Summer School
Abstract: 
Three lectures on Wave-equation Migration: Theory, Practice and Examples.

The Mathematics of PDEs and the Wave Equation

Author: 
Michael P. Lamoureux
Date: 
Tue, Aug 1, 2006
Location: 
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
Conference: 
Seismic Imaging Summer School
Abstract: 
We look at the mathematical theory of partial differential equations as applied to the wave equation. In particular, we examine questions about existence and uniqueness of solutions, and various solution techniques.

Topics in Scattering Theory

Author: 
David Colton
Date: 
Tue, Aug 1, 2006
Location: 
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
Conference: 
Seismic Imaging Summer School
Abstract: 
Three lectures explore: 1. The Direct Scattering Problem, 2. The Linear Sampling Method in Inverse Scattering Theory 3. Target Identification of Partially Coated Objects
Notes: 

"Mathematical Social Sciences;" An Oxymoron?

Author: 
Donald G. Saari
Date: 
Sun, Sep 1, 2002
Location: 
University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada
Conference: 
PIMS Distinguished Chair Lectures
Abstract: 
An explicit part of my agenda with these lectures is to encourage more mathematicians to seriously consider issues coming from the social sciences; let me assure you that you will find different and new mathematical issues. In the other direction, I also hope to encourage social scientists to appreciate the important gains that can result by using serious mathematics; I want to encourage the social scientists to seriously consider using this powerful approach. Because of these twin goals, my lectures, and these notes, are explicitly designed to address both audiences. For instance, the beginning of each section consists of examples which are intended to help develop intuition about the issues at hand. Then, toward the end of each section, there is a slightly stronger mathematical emphasis which is intended for the mathematicians. Nevertheless, I encourage the social scientists reading these notes to push on through this somewhat more technical material. Table of Contents: 1. Mathematical Physical vs. Social Sciences 2. Symmetry galore! 3. Singularity theory and departmental meetings 4. Evolutionary game theory  5. Adam Smith’s “Invisible hand” — and continuous foliations
Notes: 
An explicit part of my agenda with these lectures is to encourage more mathematicians to seriously consider issues coming from the social sciences; let me assure you that you will find different and new mathematical issues. In the other direction, I also hope to encourage social scientists to appreciate the important gains that can result by using serious mathematics; I want to encourage the social scientists to seriously consider using this powerful approach. Because of these twin goals, my lectures, and these notes, are explicitly designed to address both audiences.

Mathematics of Seismic Imaging

Author: 
William W. Symes
Date: 
Fri, Jul 1, 2005
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
PIMS Distinguished Chair Lectures
Abstract: 
These lectures present a mathematical view of reflection seismic imaging, as practiced in the petroleum industry.
Notes: 

The Richness of Thin Films

Author: 
Mary Pugh
Date: 
Thu, Jan 1, 2004
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
IAM-PIMS Distinguished Colloquium Series
Abstract: 
I will present a survey of modelling, computational, and analytical work on thin liquid films of viscous fluids. I will particularly focus on films that are being acted on by more than one force. For example, if you've painted the ceiling, how do you model the effects of surface tension and gravity? How do you study the dynamics of the air/liquid interface? How do things change if you're considering a freshly painted wall? Or floor?
Notes: 

Modeling the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases

Author: 
Bryan Grenfell
Date: 
Mon, Sep 1, 2003
Location: 
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Conference: 
PIMS Distinguished Chair Lectures
Abstract: 
Infectious diseases continue to have a major impact on individuals, populations, and the economy, even though some of them have been eradicated (e.g. small pox). Unlike many other ecological systems, many infectious diseases are well documented by spatio-temporal data sets of occurrence and impact. In addition, in particular for childhood diseases, the dynamics of the disease in a single individual are fairly well understood and fairly simple. As such, infectious diseases are a great field for mathematical modeling, and for connecting these models to data. In this article, we concentrate on three issues, namely (1) comparative childhood disease dynamics and vaccination, (2) spatio-temporal disease dynamics, and (3) evolution in diseases with multiple strains. The mathematical techniques used in the analysis of disease models contain bifurcation theory for ODEs, wavelet analysis, stochastic simulations and various forms of data fitting.
Notes: 

Vertical Control of Inventory and Pricing Decisions

Author: 
Harish Krishnan,
Ralph A. Winter
Date: 
Fri, Oct 7, 2005
Location: 
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada
Conference: 
Alberta Conference on Industrial Organization
Abstract: 

This paper offers a simple approach to the theory of decentralizing inventory and pricing decisions within a distribution system. We consider an upstream manufacturer selling to two outlets, which compete as differentiated duopolists and face uncertain demand. Demand spillovers between the outlets arise in the event of stock-outs. The price mechanism, in which each outlet simply pays a wholesale price and chooses price and inventory, never coordinates incentives efficiently. Contracts that can elicit first-best decisions include resale price floors or buy-back policies (retailer-held options to sell inventory back to the manufacturers) with fixed fees. The combination of a buy-back option plus a resale price ceiling elicits the first-best without the need for a fixed fee and is robust to asymmetry in information about demand at the time of contracting.

Estimating Disaggregate Production Functions: An Application to Northern Mexico

Author: 
Richard E. Howitt,
Siwa Msangi
Date: 
Sat, Mar 25, 2006
Location: 
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Conference: 
PIMS 10th Anniversary Lectures
Abstract: 
This paper develops a method to estimate disaggregated production function models from minimal data sets.
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